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Joseph Finder, Described by the Boston Globe as “A Master of the Modern Thriller,” Will Talk about His Latest Suspense Novel, “Guilty Minds,” on Tuesday, September 27 at 6:30 PM at the South End Library

2016 September 21
by marleen
Poster design by Mary Owens

Poster design by Mary Owens

New York Times bestselling author Joseph Finder‘s first language was Farsi, but it is in the English language that he made his mark as an award-winning suspense fiction writer, with a dozen acclaimed thrillers to his name, including three (Zero Hour, High Crimes and Paranoia) that were turned into movies. Finder will be at the South End library on Tuesday, September 27, at 6:30 PM to talk about his latest conspiracy novel, Guilty Minds, a third in his Nick Heller private eye series.

In a recent interview with WBUR‘s Deborah Becker, Finder confirmed he was recruited once by the CIA, not a big surprise to him, as he was a Russian Studies major at Yale University.  But when he was shown the cubicle where he would be translating Soviet economic policy reviews from Russian into English, he thought writing thrillers might be a better option. Since then, he has won the Strand Critics Award for Best Novel for Buried Secrets (2011); the International Thriller Writers Award for Best Novel for Killer Instinct (2006) and the Barry and Gumshoe Awards for Best Thriller for Company Man (2005). His 2009 Vanished introduced private spy Nick Heller, whose subsequent adventures Finder chronicled in Buried Secrets and the 2016 Guilty Minds.

Growing up in different parts of the world, Finder now lives in Boston, where some of his books are set, including the sharply drawn The Fixer and Guilty MindsHe tries to write one thriller a year, he told WBUR’s Becker, for which he limits himself to three  months of research and spends the rest of the time writing the story itself. His next novel will be set in Washington DC and Boston, touches on the impact on journalism of the Internet revolution and gossip web sites, and unsuspecting characters caught in their cyber vice. After that, maybe another Nick Heller book. He likes the guy…

The South End Writes is sponsored by the Friends of the South End Library. All the events are free. Books by the speakers will be available for borrowing, sale and signing by the author. The branch is fully handicapped accessible. We serve refreshments. Seating is limited, so come early if you really want the best experience.

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WGBH Commentator Callie Crossley Tells a Standing-room-Only Library Audience That Hillary’s Motivation to Become President Is “She Knows How To Do Things and Wants to Find Solutions;” Donald Trump “Just Wants to Say ‘I Won,'” but “Does Not Like Policy”

2016 September 18
by marleen

ccrossleyThe acclaimed WGBH journalist and commentator, Callie Crossley, stood for an hour-and-a-half in  a filled-to-capacity community room at the South End library last Tuesday, patiently answering questions about the current political scene, but not before she teased the enthusiastic crowd by sighing, “It’s been such a boring season.” And not until she professed her love for libraries by reading from an essay she wrote for an anthology by local authors about libraries, called Cambridge Voices: A Literary celebration of Libraries and the Joy of Reading, put together for the opening of the renovated Cambridge Public Library in 2011. “It’s impossible for libraries to disappoint me,” she said, adding she carries two library cards with her at all times.

Then the questions of the Political Gabfest began: Is Hillary lack of transparency a woman’s thing or is Hillary held to a different standard?  Why are black millennials not more enthusiastic about Hillary? Why was Hillary not indicted? Why did Roger Ailes, the former CEO of Fox News, get $40 million when he was ousted over sexual harassment accusations but Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson, who was harassed, only $20 million, when she had done “nothing wrong?” What motivates each of the presidential candidates? What question would Crossley ask if she were a moderator of a candidates’ debate? What will Bill Clinton do as First Fellow? What about the hacking threat by Julian Assange?

Crossley’s answers were elaborate and direct: Yes, being private is in part a woman’s thing, but that’s not the whole story. Yes, Hillary has been held to a different standard, and will continue to be. Yes, she and other African-American colleagues are very concerned about the lack of enthusiasm for Hillary among black millennials. Crossley who, like Hillary Clinton graduated from Wellesley College, bemoaned the “meh, meh” approach to voting by many young black women she talks with on college campuses, among them, she confessed, her niece. She attributes it, in part, to the millennials not having a historical context of Hillary’s decades-long dedication to families and children, which began well before this generation was even born.

As to the motivation of the candidates: For Hillary it is her desire to find solutions and her belief she knows how to get things done, Crossley said,  and, no, Hillary is not power hungry. She took former Secretary of State Colin Powell to task for describing Hillary as having “unbridled ambition.” “Here is a man who became a four-star general in one of the most competitive institutions, the US Army,” said Crossley. “Yet, he accuses Hillary of being ambitious.”

Donald Trump does not like policy, Crossley believes, and suspects Trump had not expected to topple his primary opponents so easily. If he wins the election, he’ll wonder, “Now what?” she speculated. As to the question of what she would ask if she were the moderator of a presidential debate, she had her answer ready: She would want to know whether the candidates support the practice to settle with families of victims of police brutality, in return for their silence. “I get it that this is not all cops or even most cops who behave that way,” she said, “but huge amounts of taxpayers’  money have been paid out under this policy,” Crossley said, “even to families who were not asking for it.” If you are a conservative, you would not want to have funds spent that way, she added, and would want to know what causes the problem so you can fix it.

To answer a question about “First Fellow” Bill Clinton, should Hillary become president, Crossley referred to an informative CBS News report on six other First Fellows, namely the current spouses of  six female governors, including New Hampshire’s Thomas Hassan and Rhode Island’s Andy Moffit. As to the threat by Julian Assange to release documents to damage the Hillary Clinton campaign, Crossley said it was “weird” but not unprecedented. There was a low-tech way to confirm gossip in office settings decades ago when she worked for ABC News, she recalled with a laugh. “It was the night cleaning lady who would tell me who was having an affair with whom,” she said. “She knew.”

 

 

 

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Ray Brown, the “Talkin’ Birds” Show Radio Host and NPR “Weekend Edition” Contributor, Will Present a 40-Minute Slide Show about Bird Migration, Thursday, September 22, at 6:30 PM, at the SE library to Celebrate “Urban Birding”

2016 September 18
by marleen
Design by Mary Owens

Design by Mary Owens

Next Thursday, September 22, at 6:30 PM, the South End branch will be open to host a remarkable slide show by Talkin’ Birds show host Ray Brown, whose illuminating bird commentary is a regular feature on NPR’s Weekend Edition with Scott Simon on Saturday mornings. Brown, who also is a radio host on the classical music station WCRB and a well-known WGBH-TV and radio fundraiser, is a longtime South End resident. In The Magic of Migration, he will answer your birding questions: Why do birds migrate? How do they decide when — and where — to go? How do they find their way? And, is it true that one bird species has been known to fly more than 7,000 miles…non-stop? Brown will also address the many threats to birds, both during migration and on their breeding and wintering grounds, and what we can all do to help birds survive.

The bird-migration slide show accompanies the Urban Birding exhibit currently on display in the Tremont Street window of the South End library, a collaboration between USES’s  Children’s Arts Centre on Rutland Street and Mass. Audubon’s Boston Nature Center (BNC). The latest Local Focus project is the fifth one sponsored by FOSEL to showcase local artists, creative entrepreneurs and non-profits in the library’s prominent window spaces. For the September exhibit, students in the CAC Vacation Arts program visited the Mattapan bird sanctuary on the former grounds of Boston State Hospital, and studied birds and the ways in which they build and maintain their nests. Inspired by their visit, the children made their own nests from natural and studio materials. Their creations, as well as nests made by actual, birds are featured in the library window.

The event is free. We serve refreshments. Seating is limited. The South End library is fully handicapped accessible. 

Mass Audubon is generously offering reduced-rate annual memberships to the South End library’s patrons, which provides free access to all Mass Audubon wildlife sanctuaries and a variety of other discounts. Membership forms are available at the library.

 

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“The South End Writes” Will Host Award-winning WGBH Commentator, Callie Crossley, and New York Times Bestselling Suspense Writer, Joseph Finder, at the South End Library on Tuesdays, September 13 and September 27, Respectively

2016 September 5
by marleen

callie posterCallie Crossley, the thoughtful, independent-minded and incisive commentator for WGBH radio and TV, will be at the South End library on Tuesday, September 13, at 6:30 PM, as the first speaker of the fifth season of FOSEL’s 2016-17 speaker series, the South End Writes. Two weeks later, on Tuesday, September 27, also at 6:30 PM, the prolific suspense writer and multiple thriller-book-award winner Joseph Finder (Paranoia, Company Man, Killer Instinct, High Crimes) will talk about his 2016 New York Times bestseller, Guilty Minds. In between, on Saturday, September 17 at noon, a last-minute booking by the South End library staff, will bring the founding publisher of Portland Magazine, novelist and playwright Colin Sargent (a relation of the Impressionist painter John Singer Sargent) with his second historical novel, Boston Castrato.

The award-winning Callie Crossley is the weekly host of the Sunday night WGBH radio program, Under the Radar, and part of the TV station’s Beat the Press team that every Friday night puts the media’s performance under its microscope and tells us what is wrong and right with it and, more importantly, why. A graduate of Wellesley College, the Memphis, Tennessee-born Cambridge resident is a frequent public speaker about issues related to gender and race as they intersect with the political scene and the Fourth Estate. She has named her September 13 talk at the South End library A Political Gabfest, during which she will field any and all of your questions after her brief analysis of the current scene.

This summer, in Crossley’s most recent achievement among many, she was awarded first place from the Public Radio News Directors Conference for her story, Tomorrow is not Promised: Life After Hurricane Katrina, which marked the ten-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. In 2013 she received the Wellesley Alumnae Achievement Award. In 1988, Crossley was a producer for Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years, for which she won an Oscar nomination, a National Emmy and the Alfred Dupont Columbia Award. In addition, she received the AP, Edward R. Murrow and Clarion awards. Crossley earned a Niemann Fellowship and a fellowship from the Institute of Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, among many other honors.

The South End Writes brings speakers to the South End library with the support of the library staff, our masterful graphic designer, Mary Owens, and financial contributions by you, library supporters. All the events are free. Books by the speakers will be available for borrowing, sale and signing by the author. The branch is fully handicapped accessible. We serve refreshments. Seating is limited so come early if you really want the best experience.

 

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Dynamic Vocalists at the Final Summer Jazz and Blues Concert on August 23 in Library Park Crowned a Perfect Season of Rain-free Outdoor Performances by Pat Loomis and Many of His Fantastically Talented Musical Friends

2016 September 5
by marleen

concert 4 7The last of the four jazz and blues concerts with Pat Loomis and his Friends completed a perfect run of outdoor music in Library Park where rain was but a distant memory. This was the fourth year of the concert series, sponsored jointly by the South End branch of the Boston Public Library and the Friends of the South End Library which received a generous donation for this purpose from the Ann H. Symington Foundation.concert 4 6

Titled Let’s Groove Tonight: A Funky Dance Party with Ivory Jones and White Chocolate, the event featured four vocalists, including a grandfather and son team, as well as the heart-rending Sarah Soulchild, whose powerful evocations of Janice Joplin could be heard on Tremont Street all the way down to Massachusetts Avenue.concert 4 8

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