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South End Library’s Seventh Annual Easter Egg Hunt Will Be Ready For You and Yours in Library Park, Sunday April 20, at 11:00 AM SHARP

2014 April 15
by marleen

eeh -2-The South End Library offers many wonderful programs, including those that  bring you this year’s winners of literary awards.  Such as the Pulitzer (Megan Marshall, “Margaret Fuller: A New American Life”); New England PEN (Doug Bauer: “What’s Next: Matters of Life and Death”); a  Guggenheim Fellowship (Chris Castellani, “All This Talk of Love”); and the First Annual Fenway Writers Contest (Allison Barnet, “South End Character”).

And then there’s the beloved South End Library Easter Egg Hunt: that’s when everyone wins: the kids, the parents, the bunny, the park, the library and spring defeating  winter. Easter eggs have been filled with poems, chocolate and knock-knock jokes. The Easter bunny has been recruited and his costume rented. The Parks Department has issued a permit. Area D4  Police will help residents cross Tremont Street. Volunteers have been recruited for setting up and taking down. We will have a separate section safe for tots. All we need is good weather (on order, too) and YOU. See you there at 11:00 AM sharp. There’s no mercy for late-comers.

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Poet and Afghan War Veteran Colin D. Halloran Will Read from his Award-winning Debut Collection, “Shortly Thereafter,” Tuesday, April 8, at 6:30 PM at the South End Library

2014 April 5
by marleen
HalloranIn an article about war writing by soldiers in the current issue of The New Yorker, George Packer notes there seems to be a lag time of about five years between deployment and publication. A lot of recent war literature by American war veterans has been from Iraq, but now the Afghanistan vets are coming out with their literary achievements. Colin D. Halloran‘s work, who will read at the South End branch this coming Tuesday, April 8, falls within that category.
After serving with the US Army there, Halloran became a secondary English and French teacher while completing his MFA at Fairfield University. He also finished his debut poetry collection, Shortly Thereafter, and developed a lecture/workshop series on the subject of understanding war through poetry. He works with students and teachers, and is an advocate for veterans and civilian education on veteran issues.  His Shortly Thereafter won the 2012 Main Street Rag Poetry Award.
The event is free. Seating is limited. Authors reading next at the South End Library are listed below. The library is fully handicapped-accessible.
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Tuesday, April 29:

 Anita Shreve, award-winning author of numerous books of fiction, including the international bestseller The Pilot’s Wife, which was made into a movie of the same name and was an Oprah Book Club selection. Her new novel, Stella Bain,  has just come out to excellent reviews in the Boston Globe.

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Wednesday, May 14:

Pablo Medina, an acclaimed Cuban-American poet (The Man who Wrote on Water) and novelist, whose latest book, Cubop City Blues, just came out in paperback.  The South End resident has received fellowships from the Oscar B. Cintas Foundation, state arts councils of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rockefeller Foundation and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. He is a professor in the Department of  Writing, Literature and Publishing at Emerson College. 

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 Tuesday, May 20:

 South End author Wendy Wunder (The Probability of Miracles) will return to talk about her latest novel, due out in April 2014, called The Museum of Intangible Things. She teaches writing at the non-profit writing center, Grub Street, and yoga at various locations in the Boston area.

 =====

 Tuesday, June 10:

 William Landay, award-winning author of crime fiction including the New York Timesbestseller Defending Jacob, The Strangler and Mission Flats.

 
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The Seventh Annual South End Library Easter Egg Hunt Will Take Place in Library Park, Sunday, April 20 at 11:00 AM (and be over by 11:02 am)

2014 April 5
by marleen

EEHBy popular request, the South End Library Easter Egg Hunt in Library Park is all set to go: the bunny costume has been ordered; the bunny has agreed to appear; the flyers are being printed; and the minute the eggs are delivered they will be distributed to volunteers to be filled with chocolate, poems and knock-knock jokes. There will be a tiny-tot section for tiny tots ONLY. There will be refreshments, balloons, and baskets for those who can’t find last year’s. Head librarian Anne Smart has agreed to open the library for the event.  The Parks Department will issue a permit. The Area D4 Police will help with crossing the street, as they have every year. All we need is good weather: we deserve it. Now is NOT the time to be late for the Hunt. It starts at 11:00 AM and will be over within minutes, you’ll see…

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“Who Put the Poison in the Wine?” Is Veteran Journalist Stephen Kinzer’s Question When Reflecting on America’s Foreign Affairs

2014 April 5
by marleen
Stephen Kinzer t the South End library with librarian Anne Smart

Stephen Kinzer at the South End library with head  librarian Anne Smart

When former Boston Globe reporter Stephen Kinzer packed his car in January 1983 to drive from South End’s Holyoke Street to Manhattan for a new job with the New York Times, he joked he’d be back in three years “when the Big Dig is done.” It took longer to complete the Big Dig, and forty years for the now award-winning veteran of foreign-policy coverage to return to live in the South End. “A manifestation of his good sense,” quipped Herb Hershfang, who introduced the speaker. Kinzer told a standing-room-only crowd at the library last week that he had a special connection to the South End and that his  book, the acclaimed The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and their Secret World War,” was written right here.

Hershfang said he admired Kinzer’s “extraordinary deep and broad knowledge of foreign affairs.” Having known him since he was an elected member of the Democratic Ward 4 committee, the retired municipal-court judge said  he cherishes Kinzer’s books for the same reason that he does Common Ground, the groundbreaking documentation of Boston’s school-busing crisis by J. Anthony Lukas: “It describes us,” Hershfang explained.

“I don’t like news because it distracts people from what’s important, which is ‘what happened yesterday’ and ‘what will happen tomorrow,’” Kinzer told the audience. His contextual approach to news frustrated his editors at the New York Times: in an overheard conversation, they asked, “Do you think Kinzer will ever write about something that happened less than a hundred years ago?” But, referring to the iconic question asked by Gary Grant in the movie Arsenic and Old Lace, ’who put the poison in the wine,’ Kinzer defended his proclivity for understanding the news, especially in foreign policy. “I want to know who put the poison in the wine,” he said. “If I were to write a memoir, that line would be the title of it.”

Kinzer, who described himself as a ‘recovering journalist,’ emphasized “we need to know how we got to where we are.” In The Brothers, he details an unbroken trail of violence and regime change organized by John Foster and Allen Dulles when they controlled the overt and covert functions of US foreign policy, as secretary of state and head of the CIA, respectively. At the same time, they moved in and out of the offices of the Sullivan & Cromwell law firm, where they were partners. When the investments of the law firm’s corporate clients were threatened, their covert political interventions destroyed nascent democracies in Iran, Guatamala, Egypt, Indonesia, Indo-China, Cuba and Congo, among other places, and left deep scars among their populations. The brothers also deepened the Cold War, ignoring outreach by the Soviet Union after Stalin’s death, among other efforts. The brothers saw the world in terms of good and evil and had no tolerance for nationalist movements, which they saw as invitations to communist takeovers.

In the US, the Dulles brothers’ exploits have been forgotten, Kinzer pointed out. Their name is mainly associated with the Virginia airport, even though they were at the center of the international mayhem that has damaged US foreign policy with consequences felt to this day. The bust of John Foster Dulles was located for decades in  a closed conference room near Baggage Carousel Number Three but, Kinzer found out two weeks ago, recently was moved back into the airport itself, likely in response to the interest in the Dulles legacy as a result of his book.  ”Power of the press,” he said, flexing his muscles. “Are we reevaluating our foreign policy,” he asked? Kinzer’s answer:

glorious victory

The real sign of that would be the time when a 16-foot-long mural depicting the overthrow of the Guatamalan government by the Dulles brothers, painted by the world-famous Mexican artist Diego Rivera, is displayed in the Dulles airport. ”With an explanation,” Kinzer added. Currently, the painting, sarcastically called Glorious Victory, is rolled up in the basement of the Pushkin Museum in Moscow, where it has been for many years. Rivera had donated it to the USSR, but the Soviets didn’t like Rivera. Leon Trotsky, the Russian Marxist and revolutionary,  had been his house guest in Mexico, among other transgressions…

 

 

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Veteran Journalist and SE Resident Stephen Kinzer, Author of “The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War,” Will Speak at the SE Library, Tuesday, April 1, at 6:30 PM

2014 March 25
by marleen

kinzer -1-Stephen Kinzer was not kidding with the sub-title of his highly praised non-fiction book covering American foreign policy in the 20th century: the Dulles brothers –secretary of state the one, head of the CIA the other– planned and executed the overthrow of half a dozen mostly democratically elected governments in developing nations from the 1950s on. In a detailed, authoritative and  –thankfully– well-written book, Kinzer, a long-time foreign correspondent and former New York Times bureau chief in Berlin, Nicaragua and Instanbul, lays it out in harrowing detail. Interspersed with the delicious sort of personal and private details about the Dulles brothers that can keep even an easily bored reader turning the page, the author builds up a history of tragic foreign intervention rooted in, among other things, unholy ties between government and corporations.

Kinzer pays homage to those who resisted the Dulles brothers’ nefarious schemes (including their accomplished sister, Eleanor Dulles), as he describes the delusional pre-occupation with the Communist threat from China and the Soviet Union against the background of a hard-won  Second World War. Timing proved of the essence. When President Harry Truman was asked to consider John Foster for a job in his administration, he said, “What, that bastard? Not on your life.” But President Dwight Eisenhower, who was convinced that the Second World War was won with the help of spies and secret intelligence operations, made John Foster his secretary of state and Allen director of the CIA. The three of them worked as a foreign-policy team from there on out.

A long-time South End resident, Kinzer is currently a visiting fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University and contributes to the New York Review of Books, the Boston Globe, the Guardian and other news outlets. He will be introduced by his friend, former municipal court judge, Herb Hershfang, who with his wife, Ann, invited him to speak at the library.

Authors coming up next at the South End Library are listed below. The South End Library is fully handicapped accessible. Seating is limited. The author’s books will be available for sale and borrowing. In the next few months, the library will host:

Tuesday, April 8:

 =====

 Poet  Colin D. Halloran, who served with the U.S. Army in Afghanistan in 2006.  A former public school teacher, Colin works with students and teachers to find ways in which poetry can inform the media’s and historians’ portrayals of war. His debut collection of poems, Shortly Thereafter, won the 2012 Main Street Rag Poetry Book Award.

 =====

 Tuesday, April 29:

 Anita Shreve, award-winning author of numerous books of fiction, including the international bestseller The Pilot’s Wife, which was made into a movie of the same name and was an Oprah Book Club selection. Her new novel, Stella Bain,  has just come out to excellent reviews in the Boston Globe.

=====

Wednesday, May 14:

Pablo Medina, an acclaimed Cuban-American poet (The Man who Wrote on Water) and novelist, whose latest book, Cubop City Blues, just came out in paperback.  The South End resident has received fellowships from the Oscar B. Cintas Foundation, state arts councils of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rockefeller Foundation and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. He is a professor in the Department of  Writing, Literature and Publishing at Emerson College. 

=====

 Tuesday, May 20:

 South End author Wendy Wunder (The Probability of Miracles) will return to talk about her latest novel, due out in April 2014, called The Museum of Intangible Things. She teaches writing at the non-profit writing center, Grub Street, and yoga at various locations in the Boston area.

 =====

 Tuesday, June 10:

 William Landay, award-winning author of crime fiction including the New York Timesbestseller Defending Jacob, The Strangler and Mission Flats.

 

 

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